Czech government snubs civil partnership ceremonies, loosens restrictions on 'traditional' weddings

An equal rights group has criticized current rules for registered partnerships, as same sex couples can't get married in the Czech Republic.

Tom Lane

Written by Tom Lane
Published on 18.11.2020 14:00 (updated on 19.11.2020)

New regulations have come into force today meaning a maximum of 15 people can now attend 'traditional' weddings in the Czech Republic, but an equal rights group has criticized the decision to not extend that to civil partnerships.

Current rules, per the government's COVID website, state that weddings are allowed to happen but there can be a maximum of 15 people present , including the couple, the officiator and the registrar.

Registered partnerships can only happen if they are “urgent”, which include two circumstances--either one of the people involved is suffering from serious ill-health or due to the length of validity of residence permits of foreigners who are in the role of future partners.

Organization Jsme fér (We Are Fair), took to Facebook to question the current situation. They said:

“Do you want to affirm your love at the time of Covid?" Yes, but only if you die. Does that seem absurd to you? A new reality for gays and lesbians.”

Same-sex couples are currently not allowed to get married in the Czech Republic although a poll earlier this year suggests over two thirds of people in the country support equal marriage.

Interior Minister Jan Hamáček replied to a Tweet on the issues saying that they will “fix it as soon as possible.”

According to iDnes, Deputy Dominik Feri, one of the co-creators of the government information website added:

"I have already written to the Prime Minister and the Minister of Health to correct this in the crisis measure, and the exception for weddings also applies to registered partnerships. There is (perhaps) nothing to object to.”

Registered partnerships have been allowed in the Czech Republic since 2006, but a bill on same-sex marriage has yet to be passed by the Czech Parliament.