Job Vacancies in Czech Republic Reach Record High

While the unemployment rate in the country stands at 3.1%, the number of open vacancies in the Czech Republic has now crossed 310,000

Jason Pirodsky

Written by Jason Pirodsky Published on 12.09.2018 10:55:26 (updated on 12.09.2018) Reading time: 1 minute

A historically low unemployment rate in the Czech Republic and high number of vacancies on the local job market have been continuing trends in 2018, and economists see no end in sight.

In August, the unemployment rate in the Czech Republic remained at 3.1%, still the lowest number in the European Union and only a slight uptick from the country’s record low of 2.7%, recorded in June.

Expected seasonal variances throughout the summer months – summer holidays for both potential applicants and recruiters – account for the curve. Forecasters predict Czech unemployment numbers to hit new record lows through the end of the year, beginning in September.

“Further recovery in the labor market should occur in September,” Kateřina Sadílková, General Director of the Czech Labor Office, told the local press.

“Unemployment could therefore stagnate or slightly decrease.”

According to official statistics, 230,499 people were registered as unemployed during the month of August. That number contrasts with a total of 313,000 jobs registered with the Czech Labor Office, a new record high.

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The largest number of available jobs was recorded in the Prague region, with some 63,000 open positions officially on the market. The lowest was in the Karlovy Vary region.

The highest demand on the labor market is currently across semi-skilled positions such as construction workers, truck drivers, warehouse handlers, production assistants, cleaners and hotel staff, chefs, and similar positions.

Because of the shortage of labor in the workforce, many companies are easing requirements for education levels and degrees, years of experience, professional qualifications, and other standards when considering an employee.

“The priority for the employer is above all interest in the position, willingness to learn new things, reliability, flexibility, and the desire to work.” Sadílková said.

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