Chat

Language

When to use which case with the preposition "Na"



Thread Tools
Lamki
Member: #93433
Reply with quote Send this user a private message View this users profile
So, I think I've got most of the declination forms. For example, z, bez, u, are all with the 2nd case and is otherwise used as personal identification (Kniha Zuzky), and so on.

However, I am having trouble with the use of the preposition "na". It is also, at least seems like, one of the most used prepositions. I just can't seem to find out when it is used with the 4th case, or the 6th case. I asked my Czech tutor, but she only knows it though childhood. I've been trying to figure it out on my own, but it's not working out very well, so I decided to ask.

Je to na okně.
Ale, dala jsem to na okno.

It seems like maybe when it is tied with a verb, it acts like a direct object, and is in the 4th case? Unfortunately, the vidím koho/co or ke komu/čemu doesn't help me much here, because I didn't grow up with these questions, and in my mind it could be any one of them.

SHORT: When is the preposition "na" tied with the 4th and 6th case, and how to recognize it with out the case questions. (And also for v, mezi, and pod, if it is a separate situation from na, as they can also be used in 2 different cases)

Thanks! This will really help me move past the declination part of Czech and move on to more things.
Report abusive posts or users
26-12-11, 09:01 PM

Active Czech
Member: #67161
Reply with quote Send this user a private message View this users profile
Hello, this is quite simple. If there is a dynamic verb in the sentence (a verb which express some kind of motion), you have to use the 4th case. If there is a static verb, you have to use the 6th case.
For example:
Kniha je na stole. Čeká na poště. Pes leží na posteli. Narodil se na Kubě. (the 4th case)
These sentences answer the question: Kde? (Where?)

x
Dám knihu na stůl. Jdu na poštu. Pes skočil na postel. Letím na Kubu. (the 6th case)
These sentences answer the question: Kam? (Where to?)

The prepositions "mezi", "pod", "nad", "před" a "za" work exactly the same way.
Where? - the 6th case (Stojím před kinem. - I am standing in front of the cinema.)
Where to? - the 4the case (Zaparkuju auto před kino. - I will park my care in front of the cinema.)

The preposition "v" is different. It is almost always used with the 6th case. There are some very rare exceptions of this rule, most importantly days: ve středu, v sobotu, v neděli.
Report abusive posts or users
29-12-11, 09:52 PM

kasmi
Member: #29063
Reply with quote Send this user a private message View this users profile
First, let me correct a technical mistake - the examples are assigned the opposite way (Kniha je na stole....the 6th case,x Dám knihu na stůl....the 4th,and Stojím před kinem is the 7th case.

Dividing verbs into static and dynamic group does not always help here.
Čeká na poště.(6th) x Čeká na Zuzku.Čeká na balík.(4th)= Čeká na to, až Zuzka přijde.

I would say the situation determines it, if there is a motion, an action involved.

"Zaparkuju auto před kinem" is perfectly ok, the result will be the same situation, Stojím před kinem.

Good luck, Lamki. : )
Report abusive posts or users
30-12-11, 11:03 AM

Next
Member: #2963
Reply with quote Send this user a private message View this users profile
Quote:
Originally Posted by Active Czech
Hello, this is quite simple.


As you mention the examples given are back to front but simple.
Report abusive posts or users
30-12-11, 12:08 PM

jezovec's Avatar
jezovec
Member: #6771
Reply with quote Send this user a private message View this users profile
Quote:
Originally Posted by kasmi
First, let me correct a technical mistake - the examples are assigned the opposite way (Kniha je na stole....the 6th case,x Dám knihu na stůl....the 4th,and Stojím před kinem is the 7th case.

Dividing verbs into static and dynamic group does not always help here.
Čeká na poště.(6th) x Čeká na Zuzku.Čeká na balík.(4th)= Čeká na to, až Zuzka přijde.

I would say the situation determines it, if there is a motion, an action involved.

"Zaparkuju auto před kinem" is perfectly ok, the result will be the same situation, Stojím před kinem.

Good luck, Lamki. : )


Being out of grammar school for quite few years I'm fortunate to forget about the cases and all formal grammar structures - just some notes here:

1. Czech language (and I think most languages') rules are not rules on which the language is build, but rather some patterns observed on the language... thus, at the end one either feels the patterns, or remember phrases, ideally both.

2. in this examples

Dividing verbs into static and dynamic group does not always help here.
Čeká na poště.(6th) x Čeká na Zuzku.Čeká na balík.(4th)= Čeká na to, až Zuzka přijde.


There is one difference here, though:

Čeká na poště = waiting somewhere (for something not explicitelly specified)
Čeká na Zuzku = waiting somewhere (not specified where) for somebody, something

Čeká na poště na Zuzku! - this is absolutelly corect and shows the nuance I think.

btw.

Čeká na poštu - is also right, but means that you are waiting somewhere for mail to come

Čeká poštu - is correct, too, and means generally expecting that some mail should come without being in a particular place where it will be delivered.

The two last examples are bit tricky in this context because they are possibe only because that the word pošta means both "post-office" and "mail" in Czech.
Report abusive posts or users
30-12-11, 12:31 PM

The views expressed here are those of the authors and not those of Expats.cz. By posting, you agree to our COC and Terms of service
Unhelpful or offensive posts may be deleted without warning, along with user account. Report abuse here.

Thread Tools Search this Thread